Brazilian Politics Society and Economy

How to prevent the Coronavirus from becoming more lethal in our settlements and camps

According to the Health Sector of MST (Movement for Landless Rural Workers in Brazil), two MST workers have already died after being infected by Covid-19, and  there are five other cases of infection.

remedies

In some States dried herbs for herbal teas are being donated and there is the production and distribution of homeopathic remedies and cosmetics

by Solange Engelmann

Drawing During the Quarantine: another MST action during the fight against the coronavirus

drawing

Faced with the pandemic of the new coronavirus (COVID-19), the ways of carrying out the struggle take new forms.

In the Landless Movement, in addition to solidarity and information campaigns, support and protection for the most in need populations, art and culture also have an important role to help us through this period, when many people are in social isolation.

Kelli Mafort: "Our steps are the size of our dreams"

During the campaign of struggle, women from the countryside and the city unite against the violence and setbacks of the Bolsonaro government.

by Maura Silva

The strength of women is kicking off the year of major mobilizations in the country. Under the motto: "For the sake of women’s lives, we are all Marielle!" Thousands of rural and urban women will unite in the fight against violence, against Bolsonaro and the setbacks imposed by his government.

Disaster Capitalism in Brazil: Mining Greed Produces a Horrific Death Toll

by Vijay Prashad

On January 25, 2019, a dam burst in the town of Brumadinho, north of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The dam was built by the iron-ore company Vale to store residue after the iron ore had been extracted. Once the dam began to crumble, it did not take long for its 13 million cubic meters of iron waste to sweep down onto the workers and into their town.

MST Encampment along the Paraopeba River feels the effect of the dam collapse

The clear waters of the Paraopeba River in São Joaquim de Bicas (MG), metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte (MG), were filled with mud and changed their color. What once was crystalline now has texture and coloring similar to an oil paint: dense, viscous, brownish. The desolate scenery is aggravated by the odor of decaying fish.

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